Framing Uzbekistan


Uzbekistan
Bukhara, Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan fifth-largest city, it has a population of 263,400. The region around Bukhara has been inhabited for at least five millennia, and the city has existed for half that time. Located on the Silk Road, the city has long been a center of trade, scholarship, culture, and religion. The historic center of Bukhara, which contains numerous mosques and madrassas, has been listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Ethnic Uzbek may constitute the largest element in Bukhara, with the native Tajiks being as numerous. The city long has had a mixed population including Jews and other ethnic minorities.


Po-i-Kalan complex, Bukhara
Po-i-Kalan complex, Bukhara
The title Po-i-Kalyan (also Poi Kalyan), which means “The foot of the Great”, belongs to the architectural complex located at the foot of the great Kalyan minaret in Bukhara, Uzbekistan. The complex is located at historic part of a town. Since 713 several ensembles of main cathedral mosques were built at this area to the south of the Ark citadel. One of these complexes, burnt out by Genghis Khan during the siege of Bukhara, was built in 1121 by the Karakhanid ruler Arslan-khan. The Minaret Kalyan is the only of structures of Arslan-han complex, which was kept safe during that siege.


Uzbekistan Bukhara
Bukhara, Uzbekistan
Bukhara has many names. One of its name was Numijkat. It has also been called “Bumiskat”. It has 2 names in Arabic. One is “Madinat al Sufriya” meaning – “the copper city” and another is “Madinat Al Tujjar” meaning – “The city of Merchants”. But, the name Bukhara is more known than all the other names. In Khorasan, there is no other city with so many names.


Bukhara, Uzbekistan
Bukhara, Uzbekistan


Uzbekistan Khiva
Khiva, Uzbekistan


Khiva, Uzbekistan
Khiva, Uzbekistan


Khiva, Uzbekistan
Khiva, Uzbekistan


Khiva, Uzbekistan
Khiva, Uzbekistan


Khiva, Uzbekistan
Khiva, Uzbekistan
Khiva is split into two parts. The outer town, called Dichan Kala, was formerly protected by a wall with 11 gates. The inner town, or Itchan Kala, is encircled by brick walls, whose foundations are believed to have been laid in the 10th century. Present-day crenellated walls date back to the late 17th century and attain the height of 10 meters. Itchan Kala in Khiva was the first site in Uzbekistan to be inscribed in the World Heritage List (1991).


Registan, Samarkanda Uzbekistan
Registan, Samarkanda
The Registan was the heart of the ancient city of Samarkand. The Registan was a place of public executions, where also people gathered to hear royal proclamations, heralded by blasts on enormous copper pipes called dzharchis. The three madrasahs of the Registan are: the Ulugh Beg Madrasah (1417–1420), the Tilya-Kori Madrasah (1646–1660) and the Sher-Dor Madrasah (1619–1636). Madrasah is an Arabic term meaning school.


Samarkanda Uzbekistan
Samarkanda
Samarkand is the second-largest city in Uzbekistan and the capital of Samarqand Province. The city is most noted for its central position on the Silk Road between China and the West, and for being an Islamic centre for scholarly study.


Gur-e Amir, Samarkanda, Uzbekistan
Gur-e Amir, Samarkanda
Gur-e Amir is Persian for “Tomb of the King”. This architectural complex with its azure dome contains the tombs of Tamerlane, his sons Shah Rukh and Miran Shah and grandsons Ulugh Beg and Muhammad Sultan. Also honoured with a place in the tomb is Timur’s teacher Sayyid Baraka.


Tashkent, Uzbekistan
Tashkent, Uzbekistan


Uzbekistan TASHKENT MEZQUITA KHAST IMAM
Mezquita Khast Imam, Tashkent, Uzbekistan

All Uzbekistan Photographs by druidabruxux

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